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FOOD FOR THOUGHT IN THE MUSIC WORLD | 4-6-2015

Recent News, Commentary, and Ideas.

HOW THE TAX CODE HURTS ARTISTS
New York Times: Amy Sohn
With tax day looming, you can practically hear the cries of creative professionals across the country. That’s because the tax code hits many right where it hurts, by penalizing them for the distinctive way they make money.

RESEARCH AND OPINION

Yannick, Unique: Philadelphia Orchestra Hopes it’s Found its Savior
The Washington Post: Anne Midgette
The general idea in the orchestral world, propagated by the orchestra itself, is that Nézet-Séguin has excelled in his function as savior.

Spotify, Tidal, Taylor Swift, And The Coming Streaming Music Wars
Fast Company: Tyler Hayes
Looking ahead, it’s nearly inevitable that on-demand streaming will catch on. And in speaking with some of Fast Company’s Most Innovative Companies in music about what they see coming over the next five years, we can peek at the future of music streaming—and beyond.

Musicians Survive in the Age of Spotify
MIT Technology Review
Two rock musicians find flaws—and hope—in a book that suggests how artists can earn a decent living even after free online access to music has ravaged the business.

One in Five American Adults Uses the Internet Only on Smartphones
Quartz: Leo Mirani
A new report from Pew punctures that assumption: It turns out that one in five American adults access the internet primarily from their smartphones.

NATIONAL

Multifaceted Music Critic Andrew Porter Dies At 86
Deceptive Cadence: Tom Huizenga
Among an unusually wide range of pursuits, Porter is perhaps best known in the United States for a two-decade stint as music critic of The New Yorker. He once wrote that he considered IU Opera Theater "as just about the most serious and consistently satisfying of all American opera companies."

Zachary Woolfe Appointed as Classical Music Editor of New York Times
Capital New York: Nichole levy
Zachary Woolfe joins the paper NYT as classical music editor, having contributed coverage of classical music to the publication since 2010. Woolfe, previously an editor and writer for this site and an opera critic for The New York Observer, will continue to write reviews and features as he takes on editing responsibilities.

Michael Fabiano’s 7 Hours from Call to Stage at the Metropolitan Opera
New York Times: Michael Cooper
The hot young tenor Michael Fabiano was out running errands near his home in Philadelphia around 1 p.m. on Wednesday when the Metropolitan Opera called, wondering if he could step in for an ailing tenor in its production of Donizetti’s “Lucia di Lammermoor.” The curtain would rise in six and a half hours. In New York.

Misty Copeland to Dance Swan Lake at DC’s Kennedy Center
The Root: Blair Ruble
History will be made at the Kennedy Center on the evening of Thursday, April 9, when Misty Copeland, a soloist with the American Ballet Theatre, joins Brooklyn Mack of the Washington Ballet in a performance of Swan Lake. Copeland and Mack, both African American, will go where no dancers of color have gone before. They will become the first African Americans to dance the leading roles of Odette/Odile and Prince Siegfried respectively in what remains our whitest performing art: classical ballet.

Communities Reinvent Themselves with the Help of the Arts
NEA: Art Works Blog guest Jennifer Hughes
Rural America is undergoing a profound economic restructuring, and many small towns have turned to their cultural and arts assets as sources of new economic development and a hook for retaining and recruiting young talent.

How Cleveland's Once-Fragile Arts Sector is Shaping the City's Future
IVOH: Lee Chilcote
In the past five years, however, while some nonprofit arts organizations have struggled or gone out of existence, still others have reinvented themselves and thrived – or at least turned the corner. One program that’s made a difference has been Engaging the Future, a Cleveland Foundation supported effort that offered operating support, project funding and technical assistance to spur innovation.

Bringing Mothers in Prison Closer to their Children, Through Music
NPR: Jeff Lunden
For the last few years, Carnegie has sponsored the Lullaby Project, which pairs professional musicians with women in jails, homeless shelters and city hospitals, to help them write lullabies for their children.

INTERNATIONAL

9/11 Opera “Between Worlds” Opens in London
The Guardian: Fiona Maddocks
A Q&A with composer Tansy Davies.

Vienna Philharmonic establishes Three-Year Residency in Naples, Florida
News-Press.com: Charles Runnells
The Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra will be traveling to Artis—Naples for a three-year residency that includes concerts, classes and more.

Julian Lloyd Webber Appointed Principal of Birmingham Conservatoire
Classical Music: Alex Stevens
Lloyd Webber will take over from David Saint, who retires in April, and will lead the organisation through the construction of a £46m new building at Birmingham City University’s new campus on Birmingham’s Eastside. The conservatoire is also planning to merge with Birmingham School of Acting in 2017.

Venice’s Opera House Expands Season, Gives Tourists What they Want
The Economist - Prospero
Relying on the robust number of tourists, the Venice Opera House is adding opera and orchestra performances to stabilize its precarious financial situation. Other Italian opera houses may look to Venice for inspiration as the government keeps cutting arts funding.

Opera Plays on Through East Ukraine Chaos
AFP: Beatrice Le Bohec
The fighting in east Ukraine may have driven away soloists and drained the coffers, but it's still curtain up at the Donbass Opera theatre, thanks to its staff's heroic efforts.

Pierre Boulez’s Life in Service to Music
New York Times: Revecca Schmid
Few musicians in history have been as influential within their lifetimes as Pierre Boulez. As a composer and theorist, he shaped the path of modernism in postwar Europe. As a conductor, he redefined concert programming. As an educator and administrator, he oversaw the creation of groundbreaking music facilities.

ENTREPRENEURSHIP

Ballet Dancers Leap into Instagram, Commerce
The Wall Street Journal: Pia Catton
For centuries, ballet was all about presenting its glittering, performance-ready side. Then came Instagram. The photo-sharing app has become the go-to social-media platform for dancers of all ages.

Five Ways Musicians Should Be Using Periscope
All About Jazz: James Shotwell
Have you heard about the latest social media trend? It’s called ‘live broadcasting,’ and while there are two companies dominating the marketplace, Periscope is emerging as the leader.

Seven Entrepreneur Types Drive Change on a Global Scale 
Huffington Post Business: Marty Zwilling
One way of identifying the right characteristics and approaches is to take a hard look at entrepreneurs who have done it. Peter Andrews and Fiona Wood, in their recent book "Überpreneurs" have profiled 36 leading candidates for this category, to extract a set of common characteristics. Here are some recognizable entrepreneurial examples.

Steinway’s New Piano can Play a perfect Concerto by Itself
Wired.com: Liz Stinson
When you buy a Spirio—not you, necessarily; they run upwards of $110,000—it comes with an iPad loaded with a Spotify-like app. This app communicates with the piano via Bluetooth, prompting the piano to play any one of the 1,700 songs recorded specifically for the instrument.

FOR FUN

Can Music Change the Way Your Wine Tastes?
The Wall Street Journal: Lettie Teague
Studies show music can influence which wines you buy and how they taste when you’re drinking them.

The Weirdest Musical Instruments
BBC Culture: Clemency Burton-Hill
As a radical new two-string violin goes on display in New York, Clemency Burton-Hill looks at some more odd instruments, from the octobass to the theremin.

DIGEST ARCHIVE

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